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Which rule of law is Justin Trudeau speaking of?

It was in September last year that Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, soon after returning from a trip to India for G20, stood up in Parliament and made the claim that there were “credible allegations” that India was behind the killing of Hardeep Singh Nijjar. Eight months have passed after that, but Mr Trudeau has […]

It was in September last year that Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, soon after returning from a trip to India for G20, stood up in Parliament and made the claim that there were “credible allegations” that India was behind the killing of Hardeep Singh Nijjar.

Eight months have passed after that, but Mr Trudeau has not been able to provide a shred of proof of the Indian government’s involvement, even after his investigators produced four Indian nationals—all alleged to be gangsters—as the possible killers of Nijjar. Trudeau’s police says that they are still looking for an Indian government connection in this. In other words, this could mean that they are hoping that Canada as part of the Five Eyes intelligence group, will be provided by the United States with damning proof against the Indian government, or one of the legacy media outlets in the US will cook up another story about India, trying to pin the blame on the top brass of the Indian government, just the way one US newspaper did recently.

Meanwhile, Mr Trudeau has been going around claiming that Canada is a “rule of law” country, and that “every Canadian has the fundamental right to live safely and free from discrimination and threats of violence in Canada”. All very well, except that in Trudeauland, the Freedom Convoy of truckers a few years ago was met with extreme violence and coercion by the Trudeau government, which went to the extent of freezing bank accounts of people who were not only involved with the protests, but also of those who had merely donated some money to the cause. In fact, Trudeau is often mocked by his opponents as an “aspiring dictator” for being too heavy handed when it comes to trying to impose his brand of “rule of law”. The latest instance is of his government’s Online Harms Bill C-63, which gives the authorities the right to jail people for posting hate speech online in the past, when the law was not in place. No country that follows the rule of law has any such retroactive provision.

The fundamental problem is Trudeau’s Chinese connection. It is to divert the Canadians’ focus from his friends from Beijing that Trudeau latched on to the India topic and tried to paint New Delhi as a rogue player trying to influence elections and politics in Canada. But as it happens, an investigation conducted by senior Canadian officials found that India did not interfere in the 2021 federal elections, when there is ample proof of Chinese interference into Canada’s elections.

Trudeau’s connection with Communist China goes back to his childhood, with his father, then Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, being a close friend of Mao Zedong and taking his children for vacation in China. Canada is witnessing a Chinese capture of almost every layer of Canadian society, say Trudeau’s critics and independent experts. Canadian journalist Sam Cooper, in his book “Wilful Blindness”, shows how it was Canada that has served as the gateway for a powerful criminal network of narcos, tycoons and CCP agents to infiltrate the West. Experts say that the Communist Party of China wanted an outpost on the US’ backyard and got one in the form of a pliant Canada. No wonder the more Trudeau comes under attack for his closeness to the malign dictatorial regime in Beijing, the more he tries to divert attention to “easy scapegoat” India.

That he has no qualms about destroying relations with India is obvious from the latest pro-Khalistan rally he attended, where rabid Khalistanis raised anti-India slogans and he just smiled in response. The anti-India activities of the Khalistanis in Canada are unacceptable. Glorifying terrorists who assassinated hundreds of people, including an incumbent Prime Minister or threatening bodily harm to Indian diplomats, Hindus, and India’s Prime Minister, is not freedom of speech.

Allowing them to indulge in such extremist activities is not establishing the “rule of law”, but amounts to interference in a sovereign nation’s internal matters. India’s External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar said on Monday that “by consular practice, country of origin is informed” about the arrest of any individual from that country. India was not informed of the arrest of the fourth suspect in the Nijjar case. He added that “We have long maintained that if any event or violence in Canada has any evidence or information that is relevant to be investigated in India, we are open to investigating it. To date, we have never received anything specific or worthy of being investigated by our investigative agencies...” Essentially, this means that Justin Trudeau has perfected the art of shoot-and-scoot, a strategy that cannot be identified as “rule of law”.

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CanadaCanadian PM Justin TrudeauOpinionTDGIndia Herald