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I drew inspiration from the reading of Telugu writers: P.V.Laxmiprasad

P.V.Laxmiprasad is an author, editor, and a literary critic in English Literature. He has to his credit 42 well deserved books in Indian Writing in English and Regional Literatures in translation. He hails from Karimnagar, Telangana. He has touched all genres –poetry, fiction, non- fiction, drama and translations. His area of research is Indian Writing […]

P.V.Laxmiprasad is an author, editor, and a literary critic in English Literature. He has to his credit 42 well deserved books in Indian Writing in English and Regional Literatures in translation. He hails from Karimnagar, Telangana. He has touched all genres –poetry, fiction, non- fiction, drama and translations. His area of research is Indian Writing in English. In this interview with P.V.Laxmiprasad, we present his experiences as an author and editor.

Q1) Tell us the motivation behind publishing books?
In fact, it goes to the credit of my late great grand- father who was a poet in Telugu. I was immensely motivated by his works. That way, my journey of writing began in the late 1900s. I am undeterred in the publishing journey.

Q2) Who influenced you most in the formative years of literary writings?
Of course, all those great writers - both Indian and English authors. In the early days, I used to read more of RK Narayan’s stories. I drew inspiration from the reading of Telugu writers. Even great Englishwriters were my instant choice. I was fortunate to interview leading English writers from India. I have reviewed 55 books so far.

Q3) As on today you have published 42 books. Anything to share?
Life is a continuous journey. For a writer, there is no saturation point. I don’t want to end up with this number. I would publish more critical books in future.
Q4) Your works include both edited and authored volumes. Anything important behind the creations?
Yes, it is true. I have published both edited volumes and authored books. My objective is to promote Indian authors in English. Some of them are yet to see the light of day. I am doing a bit of literary contribution.

Q5)It is crystal clear that you are a scholar on ancient Indian texts like Bhagadvad Gita and Upanishads. Please tell us why you are so interested?
These two texts predominantly carry India’s age old wisdom and remain central to our lives. They unravel the mysteries and philosophies of life. I am enlightened now.

Q6) Your book on Swami Vivekananda is a literary gem. Anything to share with the readers?
No doubt, Swami Vivekananda is an internationally recognized monk and scholar from India. He was my inspiration in the early days of my schooling. Millions were inspired by his great speeches and quotes. I am one among them. I paid literary tributes to Swami Vivekananda with this book on his speeches and quotes in a critical spectrum.

Q7)You have published a few books on Indian Queens. Why are you so interested?
There is no literature without history. All literature had its roots in history. Of course, Indian freedom struggle had seen many kings and queens. I just did my best to keep their sacrifices alive before the readers for successive generations.

Q10)Your two books on Indian Partition are known for their relevance. Can you throw light on them please?
Indian Partition has been a historical tragedy. The horrors of partition linger in our minds afresh. Many forms of literature are available through creative writings. I picked up Sadat HasanManto’sThe Mottled Dawn for a critical evaluation. Another critical book was an edited one in which I covered regional literatures in translation. These two publications received a huge response from the readers.

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